http://2-ps.googleusercontent.com/x/www.broadwayworld.com/images.bwwstatic.com/columnpic6/250xNxicon-fitness.jpg.pagespeed.ic.GKYM9vkZCR.jpgDuring the Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), a presentation stated that women are more likely to develop foot conditions due to unsupportive footwear than men. The most common condition is the Morton’s Neuroma; however it is not limited to those wearing unsupportive footwear, genetics and day to day activities may also be a factor.

Surgeon Kristin DiNucci stated that active women, the flat footed, as well as flat or narrow shoes are all factors in developing Morton’s Neuromas. This condition occurs at the base of the fourth and fifth toes when the nerves become inflamed. Swelling and a burning sensation are also subject to occur. In many cases wearing supportive footwear to adding orthotic insoles to the everyday routine can help prevent Morton’s Neuromas from occurring. 

Morton’s neuroma can be a difficult condition to contend with. If you are experiencing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma, talk to podiatrist Dr. Gary Ochwat of Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. Dr. Ochwat and staff can diagnose and treat your feet accordingly.

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the third and fourth toe and the ball of the foot, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible to this condition. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.  Women are more likely than men to have an occurrence of this foot condition.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

-Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot area.
-Jogging, running and any sports that involve constant impact to the foot area.
-Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformity may put you at a higher risk for developing Morton’s neuroma.

If you suspect that you may have this condition, you should visit your podiatrist. A podiatrist will first conduct a thorough physical examination to check for palpable masses between the bones of the foot.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Illinois. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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