Posts for: April, 2017

Gout, a form of arthritis that causes intense pain in the body’s joints, can be a particularly problematic condition for truck drivers due to their lifestyle and eating habits. While sedentariness is not a cause, eating purine-rich foods, such as meats, gravy, and beer, certainly is. Other factors include being overweight, diabetic, over the age of 45, having high cholesterol, hypertension, taking certain medications for said hypertension, and not drinking enough water. Prevention is key in combating gout, and this can be achieved by avoiding risk foods and staying hydrated.

Gout is a foot condition that requires certain treatment and care. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What is Gout?

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream. It often develops in the foot, especially the big toe area, although it can manifest in other parts of the body as well. Gout can make walking and standing very painful and is especially common in diabetics and the obese.

People typically get gout because of a poor diet. Genetic predisposition is also a factor. The children of parents who have had gout frequently have a chance of developing it themselves.

Gout can easily be identified by redness and inflammation of the big toe and the surrounding areas of the foot. Other symptoms include extreme fatigue, joint pain, and running high fevers. Sometimes corticosteroid drugs can be prescribed to treat gout, but the best way to combat this disease is to get more exercise and eat a better diet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Illinois. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Gout


Morton’s neuroma, caused by a thickening of tissue around the nerves in your toes, usually happens between the third and fourth toes, causing a feeling like something is stuck in your sock. Your foot, which has more than 100 muscles, 26 bones, and 33 joints, is a very complex structure, which is why foot pain can be so common. Morton’s neuroma is often treated fairly simply, by things like foot and arch supports, anti-inflammatories, orthotics, and physical therapy. It is always important to discuss with your doctor the treatment plan that is right for you. This condition must be treated to ensure that no additional foot complications develop over time.

Morton’s Neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle concerns.

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Illinois. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton’s neuroma.


By Advanced Foot And Ankle Specialists
April 11, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Fracture   Stress  

Know whether your symptoms may be that of a stress fracture or something more.

Most people try to avoid visiting the doctor as much as possible, and while our Chicago podiatrists understand that making a sudden or unexpected trip to the doctor’s may be less-than-ideal, if you are dealing with a stress fracture this is something that needs to be taken care of right away.

What is a stress fracture?

A stress fracture is a condition that causes small cracks in the bone, often due to overuse or found in athletes who play certain high-impact sports. While stress fractures can happen anywhere, they are most likely to occur in bones that take on the most weight when moving around (e.g. legs).

What are the symptoms of a stress fracture?

As with most injuries, the most common symptom is pain. This pain may become exacerbated whenever you exercise but go away whenever you limit your activities and take time to rest. You may also find that the area is swollen or tender to the touch. While pain is normal with stress fractures, bruising is not.

What can cause them?

This can happen whenever you suddenly and often drastically change the intensity or duration of your workout. Some people may find that they develop stress fractures while on holiday, since people find themselves walking around far more than they usually do on a regular basis.

Other causes of stress fractures include:

  • Wearing the wrong footwear
  • Participating in certain athletic activities
  • Having an occupation that requires you to stand or move around the majority of the day
  • Osteoporosis

How are they treated?

As you may be able to guess, if your stress fracture is due to overuse then the very first thing you should do is stop the activity that is causing this stress. Rest is the most important thing you can do to speed up the healing process. If you are someone who is involved in high-impact activities, we will recommend that you supplement your workout with low-impact activities (e.g. swimming; stationary bike) instead.

Your podiatrist may also recommend wearing different shoes to accommodate your condition and to provide better support for your feet. If the stress fracture is more severe, you may need to wear a cast or use crutches for several weeks. Only in rare or serious instances is surgery necessary to fully treat a stress fracture.

Don’t just ignore your pain and discomfort. It’s easy enough to turn to Advanced Foot And Ankle Specialists, who is happy to serve the Crystal Lake, Elgin, Hoffman Estates, Schaumburg, Huntley, Montclare and Chicago, IL, areas to make sure that everyone gets proper foot care when they need it most.


An ingrown toenail is one of the most common foot conditions to develop, particularly among adolescents, though for unknown reasons. In more common cases, an infection caused by an ingrown toenail may be treated by prescription antibiotics. But while this may clear the immediate infection, if the nail continues to cut into the flesh the infection can return. In extreme cases, the entire toenail may need to be removed. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment for your case.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Illinois. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails


If your feet feel cold, this is because it is your body’s natural response for conserving heat when it is too cold. Your body “tries to maintain its internal temperature by constricting small blood vessels under the surface of the skin. This allows more blood to move deeper in the body, so your core stays warm.” However, this leads to your body’s extremities, like the feet, receiving poor blood circulation. When taking care of your cold feet, try to wear warm, breathable socks that help wick away moisture. Opt for wool in place of cotton. Other methods include warming your feet up in warm water, drinking hot liquids, moving around to get your blood circulation going, and investing in shoe inserts to help insulate the insides of your shoes.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development.

It can also cause:

  • muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • numbness  or cramping in the legs
  • skin discoloration
  • slower nail & hair growth
  • erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always see a doctor as they will help try and fit a regime that suits you. A doctor will also prescribe you medication which will help for PAD.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Illinois. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about poor circulation in the feet




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