By Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists
December 04, 2018
Tags: foot injury  

Foot InjuryWomen’s winter boots with high, spiked heels and narrow, pointed toes may seem like the epitome of haute couture, but these boots can make feet and ankles unstable on snow- and ice-covered surfaces.

Falls from high-heeled winter boots can lead to a number of injuries, depending on how you lose your balance. If your ankles roll inward or outward, they can break. If your ankles twist, ligaments can be stretched or torn, causing an ankle sprain. Slipping or falling in high-heeled boots can also cause broken toe,
metatarsal and heel bones.

Opt for a low-heeled boot this winter, and be sure to scuff up the soles of new boots or buy adhesive rubber soles to provide greater traction.

No matter what style of boot you decide to wear this season, if you suffer a fall, contact our office for prompt evaluation and treatment and follow the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) protocol:

  • REST. Stay off the injured foot since walking can cause further damage.
  • ICE. To reduce swelling and pain, apply a bag of ice over a thin towel to the affected area. Do not put ice directly against the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
  • COMPRESSION. An elastic wrap should be used to control swelling.
  • ELEVATION. Keep the foot elevated to reduce the swelling. It should be even with or slightly above your heart level.
By Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists
October 26, 2018

Heel PainHeel pain is a common issue that affects many people. However, becoming familiar with the causes of heel pain and being able to spot them early can help you get to the root of your heel problem to find the diagnosis and treatment you need. Find out more about spotting heel pain and learn some common causes of this condition with Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists with locations in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL.

What causes heel pain? 
Though heel pain can come from many sources, there are some common conditions which can contribute to its development. If you have heel pain, you may experience difficulty standing for a long period of time or even standing on the affected foot at all. Walking may also become more problematic, especially as the condition worsens. These symptoms are often worse in the morning and improve upon activity. Common causes of heel pain often include:

  • plantar fasciitis
  • fibromyalgia
  • tendonitis
  • bone spur
  • heel spur
  • heel pad damage
  • tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • pinched nerve
  • stress fractures

How will my doctor diagnose heel pain?
Your foot doctor uses a physical examination to search for abnormalities or symptoms of underlying conditions. In some cases, they may use an x-ray or MRI to explore the inner workings of the foot. From there, your podiatrist makes a diagnosis and begins to craft a specialized treatment plan depending on your diagnosis and its severity.

Heel Pain Treatments in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL
Treating heel pain depends on several factors: the severity of your pain, your podiatrist’s diagnosis, any underlying conditions, and your lifestyle. Your doctor looks at the whole picture to begin creating your treatment. Treatment often begins with at-home and over-the-counter remedies. If these mild solutions fail to provide results, your doctor may suggest prescription medications, physical therapy, injection therapy, or a Topaz minimally invasive procedure. Your foot doctor will help you find the best solution to your heel pain.

For more information on heel pain and its causes, please contact Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists with locations in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL. Call to schedule your appointment with your podiatrist today!

Elgin, IL: (847) 468-1994

Crystal Lake, IL: (815) 356-0500

Schaumburg, IL: (847) 352-0200

Huntley, IL: (815) 356-0500

Chicago, IL: (773) 836-9900

By Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists
October 05, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

SportsFoot and ankle injuries among young athletes tend to increase during the fall sports season. Football, soccer and basketball are the sports most likely to lead to sprains, broken bones and other problems. Follow these six tips to help protect your children from serious foot and ankle injuries this fall:

  1. Treat foot and ankle injuries right away. What seems like a sprain is not always a sprain. In addition to cartilage injuries, your child might have injured other bones in the foot without knowing it. Schedule an appointment with our office if you suspect your child has a foot or ankle injury. The sooner treatment starts, the sooner long-term instability or arthritis can be prevented and the sooner your child can get back into the game.
  2. Have a foot and ankle surgeon check old sprains before the season starts. A checkup at our office can reveal whether your child’s previously injured foot or ankle might be vulnerable to sprains and could possibly benefit from wearing a supportive brace during competition.
  3. Buy the right shoe for the sport. Different sports require different shoe gear. Players should not mix baseball cleats with football shoes. 
  4. Children should start the season with new shoes. Old shoes can wear down and become uneven on the bottom, causing the ankle to tilt because the foot cannot lie flat.
  5. Check playing fields for dips, divots and holes. Most  sports-related foot and ankle sprains are caused by jumping and running on uneven surfaces. This is why some surgeons recommend parents walk the field, especially when children compete in nonprofessional settings like public parks, for spots that could catch a player’s foot. Alert coaching officials to any irregularities.                               
  6. Encourage stretching and warmup exercises. Calf stretches and light jogging before competition help warm up ligaments and blood vessels, reducing the risk for foot and ankle injuries.

If you would like a foot and ankle surgeon to evaluate your child’s feet, ankles or athletic shoes before fall sports season begins, contact our office to schedule an appointment.

 

By Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists
August 13, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: corns   Corn Removal  

Corn RemovalDo you have corns? The American Podiatric Medical Association says that about five percent of Americans do. Bothersome and irritating, these circular lesions of hardened skin resemble the vegetable we call corn. Unfortunately, they can really hurt and impede the activities of daily living. Your team of foot doctors at Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL, recommend in-office removal of corns. Learn the answers to frequently asked questions about these benign foot lesions.

FAQS about corns

1. What is a corn? This round piece of hard, irritated skin on the toe or another area of the foot grows suddenly and can last indefinitely. Sprouting in areas of irritation, such as where a shoe or poorly fitting sock is rubbing against the skin, a corn also can be soft and rubbery in texture. Either way, people who are diabetic, have circulatory or mobility problems or other serious health issues should see a podiatrist in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago for in-office removal.

2. Who gets corns? Anyone can, particularly if they stand on their feet a lot during the day, wear shoes which fit too snugly (women's shoes typically are too narrow and tight) or wear poorly fitting socks which bunch up in their shoes.

3. Should I remove them at home? Sometimes gentle rubbing with a pumice stone will remove a corn. However, much depends on the size, location, and number of corns and on the health of the person who has them. Never cut into your skin with a razor or nail trimmers.

4. What does in-office removal involve? At Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists, your podiatrist will examine your corn carefully and help you decide on the right treatment. The doctor likely will apply a moderately concentrated salicylic acid medication to lift the corn from the surface of the foot. He also may use a scalpel to trim excess skin from the area around the corn. You may go home with a prescription for antibiotics or salicylic acid patches.

5. Do corns return? Yes, they can, and they do. So, be sure to wash and dry your feet daily, wear well-fitting shoes and socks, and avoid walking barefoot. Moisturize every day with an over-the-counter foot cream, and see your podiatrist every year, or as needed, for a check-up.

Love your feet

Take good care of them to avoid annoying and debilitating skin, bone, circulatory and gait issues. If you're developing corns, please call one of the five convenient locations of Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL. Our doctors provide excellent basic care and also are highly skilled in the latest diagnostic and treatment techniques for a myriad of podiatric issues. Call 815-356-0500 to schedule an appointment in Crystal Lake, IL. Call 847-352-0200 to schedule an appointment in Schaumburg, IL. Call 815-356-0500 to schedule an appointment in Huntley, IL. Call 773-836-9900 to schedule an appointment in Chicago, IL.

By Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: bunion  

BunionsWhat happened to your foot? It hurts when you walk, especially when you first get out of bed. Plus, you notice a reddened bump at the bottom of the big toe. At Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists in Elgin, Crystal Lake, Schaumburg, Huntley, and Chicago, IL, your podiatrist sees many of these bony bumps. They are a common foot problem called bunions, and they can be corrected so you can stay active and feel comfortable.

Diagnosing a bunion

Bunions aren't unusual. A full 36 percent Americans develop bunions, and while gender (women get them more often), age (the older you get the more likely you are to get one) and heredity (bunions run in families) play significant roles in their development, bunions can happen to anyone at any stage of life. And, they are nothing to be ignored because they cause significant pain, deformity and even immobility.

What tells your podiatrist you have a bunion? Physical examination easily reveals the condition. A bunion is an obvious inward deviation of the first metatarsal bone of the foot and a pronounced bump at the base of the big toe at the metatarsophalangeal joint. Frequently, bunions lead to deformities called hammertoes and to Hallux Valgus, a crossing of the big toe toward the second and even third toes. Arthritis and bursitis may accompany bunions, leading to significant discomfort and stiffness.

If you come to Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists, your podiatrist will inspect your foot, watch you walk and take X-rays. This information helps him diagnose a bunion and to decide what treatment options are best.

Treatment for bunions

Some bunions are so severe they require a surgical procedure called a bunionectomy which removes the bump and properly aligns the metatarsophalangeal bone. Some bunions, however, respond well to more conservative interventions such as:

  • A change in shoes to ones with wider toe boxes and better arch support
  • Custom-made orthotics, or shoe inserts
  • Shoe padding (moleskin)
  • In-office removal of any corns and calluses formed from the friction between the bunion and the shoe
  • Stretching exercises and physical therapy
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers
  • Cortisone shots
  • Night splints (usually for adolescents whose bones and joints are growing)
  • Staying within a normal weight range

You and your bunion

You can look forward to better mobility and an end to your discomfort with precise bunion treatment at Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists. We have five locations to serve you. Call 847-468-1994 today to schedule an appointment in Elgin, IL. Call 815-356-0500 to schedule an appointment in Crystal Lake, IL. Call 847-352-0200 to schedule an appointment in Schaumburg, IL. Call 815-356-0500 to schedule an appointment in Huntley, IL. Call 773-836-9900 to schedule an appointment in Chicago, IL.





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Contact Us

Chicago Office

Elgin Office

(847) 468-1994
1750 N. Randall Road, Suite 160, Elgin, IL 60123

Schaumburg Office

(847) 352-0200
Nantucket Square
1043 S. Roselle Road
Schaumburg, IL 60193

Crystal Lake Office

(815) 356-0500
185 Heritage Drive, Unit 3, Crystal Lake, IL 60014

Huntley Office

(815) 356-0500
Centegra Health Center, Professional Office Building 2, 10370 Haligus Rd, Suite 109, Huntley, IL 60142

Chicago Office

(773) 836-9900
Presence Center for Health Building
Harlem & Belmont

3115 N Harlem Ave, Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60634

 

 

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